Vacation Ruined: The Consequences of a Government Shutdown

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Vacation Ruined: The Consequences of a Government Shutdown

Government employees wouldn't be paid. National Parks wouldn't be open.

WASHINGTON, D.C.--A government shutdown could mean your vacation plans need to be reconsidered. Pres. Trump talked about the possibility of a shutdown again over the weekend, after saying last week he'd be willing to go through with one if Congress does not provide money for a border wall in the new budget bills.

Who still gets their money

The deadline to pass a budget and for the president to sign it is Sept. 30.

"Somewhere around 800,000 federal employees are furloughed, which means they're not being paid," said Ball State Political Science Prof. Chad Kinsella, talking about the consequences, should a shutdown happen. "People will still get their social security checks. The military still functions."

Kinsella said Congress and the president would also likely still be paid, "which makes some people mad".

How the partial shutdown affects you

But, what is not functioning during a partial shutdown, is what could affect your plans.

"Things like parks (national), the Smithsonian, and other government entities are closed," said Kinsella. "If people are getting in last-minute vacations, especially in Washington, D.C., they could be in for a rude awakening. That vacation could be ruined."

He said even small things that you may not think of could be messed up by the shutdown.

"I was doing some research during the last government shutdown and I went to the Census Bureau website, because that's where I get a lot of information. And, it was shut down because of the shutdown."

He feels strongly about the wall and has a message

Anderson University Political Science Prof. Dr. Michael Frank said he believes the president feels strongly about getting funding for the border wall between the U.S. and Mexico. But, he may also have a message to send with a shutdown.

"It may be the case that he's trying to put some pressure on vulnerable Democrats, say Joe Donnelly, that if the president did veto it (spending bills), and Donnelly voted to override the veto, that he's voting against money for the border wall," said Frank.

How it happens

Frank said he doesn't believe a shutdown is likely, thanks to a strategy by House Speaker Paul Ryan and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to pass most of the spending bills ahead of time.

"The only way we get a government shutdown then, is if Trump vetoes those bills and the House and the Senate can't override the veto," he said. "There is a reall possibility. But, I wouldn't put it at a high probability, though."

He said Congress, both Republicans and Democrats, would likely do everything possible to avoid a shutdown.

"They don't want to raise a controversial issue that can be used in an election campaign against them for the mid-term elections in November."

PHOTO: CNN Newsource

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