Boeing Admits Confusion About Alert Linked to Fatal Crashes

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Boeing Admits Confusion About Alert Linked to Fatal Crashes

Boeing says a warning light it believed was standard on the 737 MAX was only activated if companies paid for an optional indicator.

CHICAGO -- Boeing is admitting that it knew a warning indicator wasn't working on many Boeing 737 MAX planes months before one crashed last October.

The alert was supposed to warn pilots when there was a disagreement between two sensors that measured the angle the plane is pointing. 

The company initially thought a warning light for the sensors was standard on its 737 MAX planes, but later found that it was only activated if companies bought an optional indicator. 

The alert is suspected to be linked to an October crash in Indonesia and one in March in Ethiopia.

 (Photo by anyaberkut/Thinkstock.)

 

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